Blog

 

Blog Editors: Jean-Pierre Méan – Nawal Aït-Hocine – Malika Aït-Mohamed Parent – Francesco Clementucci – Karen Egger

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of the individual author in his or her individual capacity and the information herein is not intended to constitute legal advice. Readers are encouraged to seek legal counsel regarding anti-corruption laws or any other legal issue.

The new Italian Anti-Mafia Code (1 out of 3)

Posted by on Mar 5, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

“Corrotti” like Mafiosi

 

By Francesco Clementucci 
Published on Tuesday March 6, 2018

 

In September 2017, the Italian Parliament passed a new Anti-Mafia Code which sets corruption on the same footing as mafia and brings more effective seizure procedures, transparency in assignments to fight nepotism and greater opportunities to intervene against companies infiltrated by organized crime. These are just some of the goals that the new anti-mafia code aims to reach. (suite…)

Facilitation payments in Canada

Posted by on Fév 27, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

 

By David Simpson
Published on Tuesday February 27, 2018

 

« Facilitation Payments” are no longer a permissible category of payment under Canada’s Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act, (CFOPA). The removal of the exemption was always anticipated but it has now formally come into effect. (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: Post scriptum

Posted by on Fév 20, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Answering ISO Critics

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday February 20, 2018

ISO 37001 has been generally well received and considered as an important step forward in fighting corruption globally. However, several critics, especially in the United States, have expressed doubts about the usefulness of the new Standard.

One of the points raised is that ISO 37001 is   deficient because it does not include some practices included in other instruments. (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: Getting certified (7 of 7)

Posted by on Fév 6, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

How is certification carried out?

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday February 6, 2018

 

 

Once the decision has been made to become certified for anti-corruption management systems, the first thing to do is to obtain a copy of the standard. Standards are available on-line from the ISO store (https://www.iso.org/standard/65034.html) or from national ISO member sites at a price of between $150 and $190. ISO is rather strict on affirming its copyright; the income from the sale of the standards is used to (partially) finance itself. (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: Going for certification (6 of 7)

Posted by on Jan 23, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

How does one get certified under ISO 37001?

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday January 23, 2018

 

 

One of the features of ISO 37001 is that it is a requirements standard and, as such, certifiable. This requires, however, some explanation as ISO 37001 may be used in different ways, (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: Running the system (5 of 7)

Posted by on Jan 9, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

What are ISO 37001’s requirements ?

Part 3 – Running the system

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday January 9, 2018

 

 

Running the system implies first implementing the procedures that have been put in place at the outset.

This includes monitoring the implementation of the anti-bribery policy by requesting personnel and business associates presenting a bribery risk to acknowledge receipt of the policy and committing to abide by it. (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: Setting things up (4 of 7)

Posted by on Déc 19, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

What are ISO 37001’s requirements ?

Part 2 – Putting the system in place

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday December 19, 2017

 

 

To start putting the anti-bribery management system in place, the first thing to do is to issue an anti-bribery policy.

This policy should include a prohibition of bribery and a commitment to comply with all applicable anti-bribery laws. It should be tailored to the organization, provide a framework for achieving anti-bribery objectives and include commitments to satisfy anti-bribery management system requirements and to continual improvement. It should encourage raising concerns and explain the role of the Anti-Bribery Compliance Function as well as the consequences of not complying with the anti-bribery policy. (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: First steps (3 of 7)

Posted by on Déc 4, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

What are ISO 37001’s requirements ?

Part 1 – The first steps

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday December 5, 2017

 

 

ISO 37001 reflects the development of anti-bribery practices in the advent of the introduction of corporate liability in the State parties to the OECD Convention. Its requirements are therefore not new to practitioners in the field. What is innovative about ISO 37001 is that it offers a structured and in-depth approach to anti-bribery which has not existed to the same extent before.

When starting to implement an anti-bribery management systems two preconditions are required to lay the groundwork for success.  (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: Benefits (2 of 7)

Posted by on Nov 28, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

What are the benefits of the standard?

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday November 28, 2017

 

 

The standard can be used in a variety of ways which benefit an organization.

It can first be used as a reference for the establishment or improvement of an anti-bribery management system. ISO 37001 has built on other instruments which have provided guidance to organizations engaging on a path of integrity. (suite…)

All you need to know about ISO 37001: What is ISO? (1 of 7)

Posted by on Nov 21, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

What is ISO and how does it issue standards

 

Jean-Pierre Méan

By Jean-Pierre Méan 
Published on Tuesday November 21, 2017

 

ISO, the International Organization for Standardization, was created in 1947 following an international conference attended by representatives of 25 countries in the fall of 1946 in London. It is an association according to Swiss law and is registered like any ordinary association in Geneva.

The ISO members are National Standards Bodies dealing with standardization in their respective countries. ISO also has correspondent or subscriber members from countries without a member body. There are currently 118 member bodies, 40 corresponding members and 3 subscriber members.  (suite…)